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  #11  
Old 02-13-2018, 09:36 PM
Glenn Glenn is offline
 
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I think you want it small enough that you can easily pop it in and out. For me 30 inch by 30 inch work well.
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  #12  
Old 02-13-2018, 09:57 PM
tofu tofu is offline
 
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24x48 is a nice folding table size. Although with MDF top that will get a bit heavy without dog holes.
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  #13  
Old 02-16-2018, 08:00 PM
joebehr joebehr is offline
 
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Default squaring up guide rail

Just got the squaring set up for my 36" track and it is great!!!
I used it to square up my B300 as well...quick & easy way to do it.
Everything that I have from Dino works very well...keep the new ideas coming.
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  #14  
Old 02-17-2018, 09:31 AM
kenk kenk is offline
 
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When I purchased my gently used EZ-One I was VERY fortunate that it came with an assortment of EZ Smart Bench Clamps (no longer listed on Eurekazone.com).

It seems to me that the combination of the EZ-One sliding rails, the EZ Smart 6-way Stops, and the EZ Smart Bench Clamps is more flexible than the bench dog holes. The holes are fixed in place. The sliding rails ... well ... slide.

It may sound a bit absurd, but I've wondered if having a third sliding rail on the EZ-One might provide more clamping options for shorter material. If I have a short length of material, then I can place the near edge on the squaring rail, the far edge on the original sliding rail, and then I could slide the "extra" sliding rail as needed under the material for clamping. Of course it would be "EZ" enough to slide the extra sliding rail on/off as needed - so long as I made sure kerf cut was aligned properly with the edge of the guide rail.

If the EZ-One table inserts had bench dog holes I can imagine that horizontal stops might inserted into the holes and might be useful. The recently released Kreg In-Line Clamp,which pushes sideways rather than downward, might be an interesting addition. Beyond that I think the third sliding rail might be better for me than the bench dog holes.

The only negative might be if the Bench Clamps cost more than the bench dogs. Still, I'd prefer having adjustable clamp pressure, and the ability to purchase Bench Clamps with extra long throats (reach), if available.

As to the size of EZ-One MDF table inserts, it seems that I'd want a set of 2 inserts that are sized to provide maximum surface space - depending upon whether or not one cuts all the way through the 3/4 inch depth. If cut all the way through then there would be 4 inserts, of course Each insert would be the same rail-to-rail depth and would have the far side sliding rail all the way to the back, and the other sliding rail midway between the clamping table and the far side sliding rail. OR do folks think less deep inserts would be preferred??

Last edited by kenk; 02-17-2018 at 09:40 AM.
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  #15  
Old 02-17-2018, 01:21 PM
Dino Dino is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kenk View Post
When I purchased my gently used EZ-One I was VERY fortunate that it came with an assortment of EZ Smart Bench Clamps (no longer listed on Eurekazone.com).

Kenk, Only for few more weeks.
Just to make sure that the supply chain is strong...I made 2 molds with 2 suppliers. Believe it or not...both are lost. One guy retired and the other sold his place and they ....scrap the mold for the clamps.

It seems to me that the combination of the EZ-One sliding rails, the EZ Smart 6-way Stops, and the EZ Smart Bench Clamps is more flexible than the bench dog holes. The holes are fixed in place. The sliding rails ... well ... slide.
I'm with you on this one. the sliding fences and open top design is more flex able...If you use it right. On the new tops users will have all options open.

It may sound a bit absurd, but I've wondered if having a third sliding rail on the EZ-One might provide more clamping options for shorter material. If I have a short length of material, then I can place the near edge on the squaring rail, the far edge on the original sliding rail, and then I could slide the "extra" sliding rail as needed under the material for clamping. Of course it would be "EZ" enough to slide the extra sliding rail on/off as needed - so long as I made sure kerf cut was aligned properly with the edge of the guide rail.

the Squaring fence slides. You have 3 sliding fences.


If the EZ-One table inserts had bench dog holes I can imagine that horizontal stops might inserted into the holes and might be useful. The recently released Kreg In-Line Clamp,which pushes sideways rather than downward, might be an interesting addition. Beyond that I think the third sliding rail might be better for me than the bench dog holes.

The only negative might be if the Bench Clamps cost more than the bench dogs. Still, I'd prefer having adjustable clamp pressure, and the ability to purchase Bench Clamps with extra long throats (reach), if available.

Make one. use a spacer to apply pressure to the materials and clamp the spacer. the pressure will be transfer to the materials.




As to the size of EZ-One MDF table inserts, it seems that I'd want a set of 2 inserts that are sized to provide maximum surface space - depending upon whether or not one cuts all the way through the 3/4 inch depth. If cut all the way through then there would be 4 inserts, of course Each insert would be the same rail-to-rail depth and would have the far side sliding rail all the way to the back, and the other sliding rail midway between the clamping table and the far side sliding rail. OR do folks think less deep inserts would be preferred??
have fun, good to see that others like the sliding fences.
with an ez rigid connector...they become guides.
Guides, supports, fences and clamping channels at once.
I think is better than holes.
I saw a new system that works with holes...made in Florida.
I will provide a link if I can find it.

tx
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  #16  
Old 02-17-2018, 01:27 PM
Dino Dino is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by joebehr View Post
Just got the squaring set up for my 36" track and it is great!!!
I used it to square up my B300 as well...quick & easy way to do it.
Everything that I have from Dino works very well...keep the new ideas coming.
Is this the normal square?
When you square it 100%...make a hole and use a pin.
do the same for 22.5 and 45 degree.
same with the bridge,
After you have a perfect cut...screw the bridge in place.
or use two spacers -locators next to the bridge and screw them in place.
cut the bottom of the bridge ( I think Burt did that First)
and now you have a removable bridge.
screw the bridge in top of any table and now you have another ez tool.
YOURS!!!! welcome to ez.

tx'd
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  #17  
Old 03-10-2018, 05:58 AM
norwood norwood is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kenk View Post
...
It may sound a bit absurd, but I've wondered if having a third sliding rail on the EZ-One might provide more clamping options for shorter material. ...
I think this is a good idea. My workbench has four sliding rails. This allows the right side to permanently have a bench top (and a vise). The left side of the workbench will still be versatile. It can either be an open design or I can use it for my router table or other «plug-ins». On the photo you see my router table «plug-in». I’m working on a soulution where the left side also can serve as a lathe. The idea is to mount the headstock on one rail, the tailstock on the other sliding rail and the tool rest on the workbench frame. I don’t want to spend too much money on tools that I only use now and then, so I try to find low-cost-solutions. Since my workshop is tiny, I need to squeeze the most out of this workbench.


Last edited by norwood; 03-10-2018 at 05:14 PM. Reason: the photo didn't show
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  #18  
Old 03-10-2018, 03:53 PM
Dino Dino is offline
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[QUOTE=norwood;111801]

I don’t want to spend too much money on tools that I only use now and then, so I try to find low-cost-solutions. Since my workshop is tiny, I need to squeeze the most out of this workbench.

you can always use extensions with removable connectors...
I will make a list of short extrusions and have a big sale for the forum.

tx
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  #19  
Old 03-15-2018, 01:26 PM
Absinthe Absinthe is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by norwood View Post
I think this is a good idea. My workbench has four sliding rails. This allows the right side to permanently have a bench top (and a vise). The left side of the workbench will still be versatile. It can either be an open design or I can use it for my router table or other «plug-ins». On the photo you see my router table «plug-in». I’m working on a soulution where the left side also can serve as a lathe. The idea is to mount the headstock on one rail, the tailstock on the other sliding rail and the tool rest on the workbench frame. I don’t want to spend too much money on tools that I only use now and then, so I try to find low-cost-solutions. Since my workshop is tiny, I need to squeeze the most out of this workbench.

At first glance I was going to ask how you keep from cutting into your router table, but I saw that you called it a "plugin". The next question is, how do you keep from cutting into your rails? (I am in the design phase myself now, and I see so many designs with the track going over the top of a set of rails, but I don't see any saw cuts on the rails. What am I missing?
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  #20  
Old 03-17-2018, 08:14 AM
norwood norwood is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Absinthe View Post
At first glance I was going to ask how you keep from cutting into your router table, but I saw that you called it a "plugin". The next question is, how do you keep from cutting into your rails? (I am in the design phase myself now, and I see so many designs with the track going over the top of a set of rails, but I don't see any saw cuts on the rails. What am I missing?
I cut into the rails when I use the tracksaw. The first cut you make with the saw will leave a groove into the rails (and into whatever bench top you put between the rails). After that, the saw will always follow the same groove. The idea is to ajust the saw depth for every new cut so that it fits the depth of the workpiece. That way it won't cut too deep into the rails.
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