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  #41  
Old 10-28-2017, 08:29 PM
RED RED is offline
 
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Location: Oklahoma
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tracedfar View Post
I use a DIY PBB. I don't have or need an actual fence but I did incorporate a length of Kreg miter fence track with a measure tape and a flip stop. I just lock down the stop at my desired length and make as many repeat cuts as I need. I really like that I'm able to flip it out of the way without changing the setting (in case I need one or two more). Two are even better.

It saves a step or two.

Another way that works just as well is to mark a cut line on the first piece, set it up for the cut, then fasten a stop block to the table at the end of the piece and do all the repeat cuts I need. When I'm done I throw the scrap away, no need for special tools that get misaligned, broken, or lost. And I really like that.

I'm probably going to upgrade to the folding EZ1, or 2, or whatever the latest version is when I finally do it. I don't see why I couldn't incorporate sliding flip stops into the SSME cross rails. A few of them could be better than a story stick.
More good ideas, thanks!

Robert
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  #42  
Old 10-29-2017, 02:15 AM
Tracedfar Tracedfar is offline
 
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Location: Balko, OK
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Well, while we're confessing our TS missteps...
About three weeks ago I was ripping used 1x6's on a TS at a friend's house. Anyway, a nail we thought we'd removed had actually broken, leaving half of it embedded and invisible.

Short story, the blade caught the nail and threw it into the center of my wrist. It was hot and cauterized the wound and I burnt my fingers trying to pull it out. So, got a pair of pliers and removed the 3/8" long piece. No blood, no pain, but also no feeling on the sides of my middle and ring finger. After three weeks I still don't have much feeling back.

I was wearing eye and ear protection and using a push stick but it didn't help. We just missed the nail and it bit back.

I think a guard over the blade could have helped prevent this but it was an older saw.

I don't know that a track saw would have been safer in this instance. Would the nail have been thrown away rather than back at me?

Lesson: Be wary of repurposed material.
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  #43  
Old 10-29-2017, 08:45 AM
Dino Dino is offline
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nice way to enjoy your coffee in the morning.

and a good reminder that we must finish the ez job.
with a tracksaw the guide and the saw are actually safety devices?
the blade is pushing the wood against the track and the saw base.
with support on both sides of the blade there is no room for any left over nails
or materials to hit the operator.

With a tablesaw the kickback sends projectiles to the operator...due to rotation of the blade..
with a tack saw the kickback is actually kick-front? make sure nobody is standing in front of the saw?
Or, don't pull the front plunge saw in order to finish a 48" panel...because you can't reach? I saw this in youtube-videos.
With a normal saw you have more reach..the winner is ez here. not all track saws are similar.
The EU plunge saws are not as safe as they want you to believe...

they even provide a kickback stop because you're pushing the materials away from the track...at the initial plunge.
The right way to use a plunge saw is actually not to plunge on the materials.
any-way...after 2 decades of misinformation vs EZ... people continue to be the victims...

when we first start making the ez tools we had no extra money for all the right tools needed for the making of the ez tools.

We had to cut our own metal rods, aluminum extrusions , plates.
Plastic, wood and you name it.

oNe simple ( Few) track and a moduni base eliminate the need for many-many tools. later, as we trusted ez more and more we build few ez jigs to make the bridge and all parts needed. I missed the days where machinists from the Edison and other towns was visiting the ez-shop to make few interesting cuts in all types of shapes and materials that we never thought a simple track with the smart clamping system, a simple saw and the ssrk can actually do the job .
Keep in mind that those guys had millions invested in tooling and machinery.

We even posted few videos in youtube making the cuts with zero ( perfect ) accuracy and total safety.
Later, we start using CNC's and realize that a simple jig can actually eliminate the need for "nothing but issues" expensive and complicated machinery.
The same time you don't have to find and pay a fortune for the programmers,
machinists. real estate and the cnc repair man...
we actually was working to feed the machines...

We're I'm going with this? non where...
just thoughts popping after reading your post.

If you visit a high-end, high volume production factory you will see the
Beam saws. some are priced over a million and they require few thousand sf
of space with all the supporting equipments.
Well, Think of the track saws as mini Beam saws without the computer.
now you can start comparing the tracksaws vs a table with a spinning blade.


just thoughts....they go well with my coffee that is getting cold.
sorry fot the accident, I hope you get better.

tx
d




.
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Last edited by Dino; 10-29-2017 at 11:03 AM.
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  #44  
Old 10-29-2017, 02:53 PM
JamesMac JamesMac is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Location: Texas
Posts: 43
Default drop in panels for EZ One

Hi All,

first off, I feel badly about always lurking in the shadows and soaking up the great information that you guys freely give. I have an unlimited amount of questions. I am hoping that as I progress that someday I will have acquired some useful info that I can also share.... anyway...

I just got a painful lesson about plywood. Apparently the US no longer makes the lower end 3/4" BC plywood. If you want that then you are forced to accept weird dimensioned wood such as 23/32, 19/32 etc, which is code for "we are forcing you to go metric."

The US still makes high end plywood in 3/4" thickness, but you pay up for it big time.

I needed some 3/4 ply to make some drop-in panels and jigs for my new EZ One and to replace some mdf junk on my buddies garage work bench. I ended up getting a sheet of 3/4 poplar plywood that will make the best looking jigs in town but is overkill quality for what I needed.

I will probably continue to pay up to use 3/4" ply but I hope the day does not come soon where ply is no longer produced domestically. It reminds me of the power tool makers. First some of their line was produced in China or somewhere similar. Then practically all of it. Eventually even the better power tool makers fell to this so good luck finding any power tools produced here. I have a suspicion that this process is now occurring in lumber land.

I hope that I have gotten way ahead of myself and even better yet, that I am wrong.

Thanks for making a great product that is built like a tank! I have just about all of your current products and I am really looking forward to use them in the next year.

I know that you are re-doing your product line. I hope that you stay true to backwards compatibility so that users who already have EZ Ones etc can just add on the new stuff etc. Also please dont forget about those upgraded brackets for the UEG.

I saved the questions for last!

Question - 23/32 is pretty close to 3/4", so would it be a good idea to use that as a drop-in panel or jig for the EZ One? Would the difference in dimension create any issues? Is there another metric dimension that would work better?

Dino, I hope that you stay true to backwards compatibility so that users who already have EZ Ones etc can just add on the new stuff etc. Also please dont forget about those upgraded brackets for the UEG.

Take care,
Jim
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  #45  
Old 10-29-2017, 04:07 PM
Dik Harrison Dik Harrison is offline
 
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Jim,

I made my panels with a true 3/4" edge added where they sit on the SSME.

Dik
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  #46  
Old 10-29-2017, 05:00 PM
JamesMac JamesMac is offline
 
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Dik,

Did you cut a 3/4 edge from plywood or something else? Did you attach the edge with glue only? Some of these drop-ins might end up being sacrificial.

sorry for so many questions, trying to visualize exactly how you did it..

thanks,
Jim
(dont worry about hurting my feelings! Assume I know nothing...)
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  #47  
Old 10-29-2017, 05:39 PM
kenk kenk is offline
 
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Why not just use 3/4" MDF? Its cheaper and should be a true 3/4" thick. A bit dusty to cut of course.

Ken K.
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  #48  
Old 10-29-2017, 05:49 PM
JamesMac JamesMac is offline
 
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Ken,

That is definitely an idea worth exploring. I did not think of that. I would think that 3/4 mdf would be strong enough to withstand at least a little abuse, if it doesnt get wet.

thanks,
Jim
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  #49  
Old 10-29-2017, 06:05 PM
Dik Harrison Dik Harrison is offline
 
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I think I used dowels and glue to attach pine strips that had been planed to 3/4", but splines, biscuits, or tongue and groove could be used.In the past I have used melmine covered particle board which is 3/4" also.
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