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Old 12-01-2017, 11:21 AM
kenk kenk is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 238
Default Fastening EZ Smart Clamping Table Top to 2x4 Frame

I recently adopted an EZ Smart Clamping Table Top, and was planning to make a simple frame and legs/braces using 2x4's.

I figure I'll rip the top edges of the 2x4 frame pieces to ensure that they are perfectly flat, and I"m planning to put two cross braces under the table, just to ensure that there is no sag over time.

My plan was to use (Kreg) pocket holes to fasten the Clamping Table Top to the 2x4 frame. Do you foresee any troubles with the pocket hole screws going into the bottom of the table top's MDF? I assumed it is MDF - I think I had read that mentioned in one of the descriptions - somewhere.

I'll do some test pocket holes on scrap to make certain the screws won't accidentally go through the surface of the table top (gasp!!).

By the way, I had always assumed that the EZ Smart Clamping Table Top's extrusions were fastened with screws, but instead Eurekazone takes no chances and clearly does not cut corners on this product - the extrusions are actually fastened with bolts that go all the way through the entire thickness of the table, and the bolts are fastened using T-nuts on the bottom (see pic below).

I also assumed that the table's orange surface was just laminate, but clearly it is some other kind of coating that was applied after cutting the dadoes. Not exactly sure what it is, but it looks great. Time will tell how tough it is.
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Last edited by kenk; 12-01-2017 at 11:29 AM.
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  #2  
Old 12-01-2017, 01:50 PM
sean9c sean9c is offline
 
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Just a suggestion. Lumber never stays straight, you can mill it straight, then the moisture content will change and it'll move. I never use lumber when I can avoid it. Rip up a bunch of plywood strip and glue them together to your 2x4's. It'll be a lot more stable.
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Old 12-01-2017, 07:15 PM
kenk kenk is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sean9c View Post
Just a suggestion. Lumber never stays straight, you can mill it straight, then the moisture content will change and it'll move. I never use lumber when I can avoid it. Rip up a bunch of plywood strip and glue them together to your 2x4's. It'll be a lot more stable.
Ahhhh! I was thinking of using plywood instead of 2x4's but thought it wouldn't be as strong. Now you have me wondering if for the frame I should glue 2 - or 3>? - strips together (laminated) and use them instead of the 2x4's. 3/4" plywood is pretty strong stuff. Maybe I don't even need to laminate them.

I do need to be very careful where the frame lies relative to the t-bolts (t-nuts?) on the bottom of the clamping table top.

Do you think I should do that for the legs too? Do I need to laminate them there too? I mean the Ron Paulk workbench is made entirely of 1/2" plywood, so I suppose it would be strong with 3/4" plywood. I was planning on building up legs by joining two boards (originally 2x4's) lengthwise at 90 degree angles using pocket hole joints, and then fastening them to the outside of each frame corner. Putting brace strips across all four sides about 12" up would likely make this thing very strong - even if made from plywood instead of 2x4's.
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Old 12-01-2017, 10:36 PM
Tracedfar Tracedfar is offline
 
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Location: Balko, OK
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Just my two cents...

Pocket screws should be okay.
If you plan to never remove it, glue it, too.

For mine, I made a torsion box from plywood, topped it with melamine, and used EZ double tracks and clamps. l made drawers in the cabinet below. It also serves as an outfeed table for the rare occasion I use my table saw.

Pics are on another thread in the forum.

Plywood is very stable but solid wood properly prepared, joined and finished is also very stable, strong, and beautiful. So, to me the questions are what do you have on hand, how much time do you have and where do you want to spend your time and money - on plywood or solid wood. Either material can make a great product.

What a great problem to have!
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Old 12-01-2017, 11:54 PM
sean9c sean9c is offline
 
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How strong do you figure you need it to be? You'd have to try pretty hard to figure out how to break a 2x4 piece of laminated plywood. Likely as crappy as lumber is now a 2x4 piece of lumber would break first.
For the legs just make some L shape pieces, from 1/2 or 3/4 ply, that fit in the corner of the frame.
I'd just glue and screw it together using epoxy. It'd be super strong.

Quote:
Originally Posted by kenk View Post
Ahhhh! I was thinking of using plywood instead of 2x4's but thought it wouldn't be as strong. Now you have me wondering if for the frame I should glue 2 - or 3>? - strips together (laminated) and use them instead of the 2x4's. 3/4" plywood is pretty strong stuff. Maybe I don't even need to laminate them.

I do need to be very careful where the frame lies relative to the t-bolts (t-nuts?) on the bottom of the clamping table top.

Do you think I should do that for the legs too? Do I need to laminate them there too? I mean the Ron Paulk workbench is made entirely of 1/2" plywood, so I suppose it would be strong with 3/4" plywood. I was planning on building up legs by joining two boards (originally 2x4's) lengthwise at 90 degree angles using pocket hole joints, and then fastening them to the outside of each frame corner. Putting brace strips across all four sides about 12" up would likely make this thing very strong - even if made from plywood instead of 2x4's.
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  #6  
Old 12-02-2017, 11:21 AM
kenk kenk is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
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In the end I'll likely use 2x

Funny, it just dawned on me that I can't glue the Clamping Table Top to the frame since the Top's bottom is coated with stuff that glue won't stick to. Ha ha ha.

The Eurekazone Clamping Table instructions describe attaching the top to a 90 degree angle extrusion using 36 #8 x 3/4" pan head screws. It looks like they use 12 screws along each 4' side and 6 screws along each 2' side. That is 36 screws - a LOT of screws!

If I leave a 2" overhang underneath for placing clamps under the edges, and then put pocket holes every 2", that will be 7-8 screws on each 2' side and 20-21 screws on each 4' side, so I'm thinking that will be plenty strong even without glue. I'm not so worried about the side-to-side strength as I am the top lift strength - if I for some reason lift up the table by pulling on the table top.
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